Latest Threads

Forum Statistics
  • Forum posts:28
  • Forum threads:26
  • Members:8
  • Latest member:Julie Rizz


Posted by: Julie Rizz
16-10-20, 06:58 PM
Forum: Family History Requests
- No Replies

1881 England Census   Trumpet Terrace Cleator, Cumberland
John Mathews age 50, Mary Mathews age 28, John age 7 born in Ireland, Thomas age 6 born in Cleator, Mary age 1 born in Cleator.
These may be my Great Grand Parents with John age 7 my grandfather.
John Sr. was an iron miner.  The family immigrated to Pennsylvania in the US and worked in the coal mines.
Is there any way someone could look in the Baptisms for St. Mary's church in Cleator for baptisms for Thomas and Mary?  John may be there also.
I have not been able to find him in the Irish Civil records even though he was born after civil registration started.
Thank you for any help, directions, suggestions that may come my way.
Julie Matthews Rizzello

Print this item


Posted by: Admin
23-07-20, 08:55 AM
Forum: Notice Board
- No Replies

Little Ireland has developed a search engine for the town of Cleator Moor, so if you are looking for something specific, please take a look here.

Print this item


Posted by: TheGreatSociety
14-06-20, 09:56 AM
Forum: Family History Requests
- No Replies

Cleator Moor is a little out of my area, but I'm able (in normal times) to access Penrith Library to view copies of the Mid-Cumberland and North Westmorland Herald, for research into the Boer War, 1899-1902.

Have come across a letter from a Penrith man (Sergeant-Instructor Richardson, of the Border Regiment, who had been transferred to the Imperial Light Infantry, a South African unit, raised in Durban) published in the paper, which mentions a Cleator Moor man - a Private McAvoy. It was in the Herald's edition of Saturday 3rd February 1900.

"Perhaps it will surprise you to hear that we have more Cumberland and Westmorland men out here in this colonial corps, viz.,...…Private McAvoy, Cleator Moor (half brother of Sergt. Mather); and four more Cleator lads."

The only McAvoy in the Imperial Light Infantry's nominal roll is 740 Private John McAvoy, who enlisted on 15th November 1899 and was discharged on 26th December 1900.

Should anyone know of a McAvoy family in the area around 1900, I'd be interested to learn more. John obviously won't show up in the 1901 UK census.

Print this item


Posted by: Admin
16-02-20, 03:31 AM
Forum: Gallery
- No Replies

While not a native of Cumbria, hardy Highland Cows can be seen roaming (or laying) across the county. This one was chilling out on Cold Fell near Ennerdale. 

[Image: GFxYvfal.jpg]

Print this item


Posted by: Admin
14-02-20, 02:21 PM
Forum: Gallery
- No Replies

The West Pier Lighthouse (pictured) was completed around 1839, and officially opened in 1841. The white tower with red trim is built into the breakwater which has two levels, joined by cases of 17 steps. The lighthouse is 14 metres high in total, but the full height of the tower can not be seen from the sea, because the breakwater wall is several metres taller on the seaward side. It is a simple stone lighthouse with glazed lantern and ogival cupola.

[Image: Mk2yN6Cl.jpg]

Print this item


Posted by: Admin
14-02-20, 07:09 AM
Forum: Gallery
- No Replies

St Bridget’s Church church is located 1 ½ miles north of Whitehaven just to the seaward side of the main A595 road. It is a distinctive landmark and can be seen easily from the road (especially from the north).

The church is a Grade II listed building.


[Image: gVyBPzal.jpg]

Print this item


Posted by: Admin
10-02-20, 05:00 AM
Forum: Gallery
- No Replies

A typical traffic jam in Cumbria. Bah!

[Image: CnEjO4Zl.jpg]

Print this item


Posted by: Admin
09-02-20, 07:20 PM
Forum: Gallery
- No Replies

A short walk along the cliff top from Haig Colliery in Whitehaven, West Cumbria, a small stone cairn marks the site of King Pit. The mine was sunk in 1750 by Sir Carlisle Spedding, which by 1793 reached a depth of 296 metres – then the deepest coal mine in the world.

An interesting feature of Whitehaven and surrounding areas is that there is a large expanse of grass land along the top of the cliffs, with the houses being set well back. The main reason for this is that at one time all the mines, railways and inclines were along the cliff tops, these have now gone to leave the open space.

King Pit appears to have remained an important winding pit until around 1800. It is labelled as “Kingpit Yard” on the 1st-3rd Ordnance Survey editions; on the 1st edition it still had waggonway access, implying industrial use.

The site is marked by a beehive shaft capping and plaque; given the extensive landscaping of this area after the closure of Haig Colliery, the survival of below-ground deposits is uncertain. The opening of a rock-cut adit also survives, just above high-tide level in the base of the cliff to the west; this was probably a ‘pumpway’, for discharging water pumped up the King Pit shaft.


[Image: DH5WLTxl.jpg]

Print this item


Posted by: Admin
05-02-20, 03:04 PM
Forum: Gallery
- No Replies

Crummock Water is located between Loweswater and Buttermere. The lake is 2 ½ miles long, ¾ mile wide and 140 feet deep and is a clear, rocky bottomed lake flanked by steep fells.

[Image: BhD2EAgl.jpg]

Print this item


Posted by: Admin
03-02-20, 08:27 AM
Forum: Gallery
- No Replies

Cumbria is home to some great golf courses. Golf isn't my cup of tea, but I do appreciate their design.

The course at Whitehaven was founded in the year 2000. It is a challenging course with many varied holes. Coupled with the spectacular views of Ennerdale and the surrounding fells. The course is 6246 yards, and features 9 ponds and 3 woodland areas.

[Image: g8dVJuZl.jpg]

Print this item


Latest News Headlines From Little Ireland: